This information that is quoted from this web site and shared with you, is in hopes that you gain more insight into your child’s specials needs…   We do not endorse the websites referenced.  A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.  Information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

Why can’t my child speak clearly? Why your child may not qualify for speech services?

Type of Special Need 

D y s a r t h i a

School Term :(SLD - Specific Learning Disability

This condition is a weakness of the muscles used for speaking. 

What to look for:

The child might speak in a whisper, have slurred speech or appear to be talking through his nose.  There may also be other physical problems related to their being unable to control their muscle movement. Children with cerebral palsy often have dysarthia.    

Teaching Strategies

People who can help: SENCO/Resource Teacher; Speech/Language Therapist

www.socsci.ulst.ac.uk/education/scte/sen/types/dysarthia.html  

Dysarthia

Dysarthia is a speech disorder that results from weakness and/or in coordination of the nerves and muscles that control speech. Dysarthria can be caused by progressive neurological diseases such as Parkinson's or Lou Gehrig's disease; or by conditions such as stroke or head injuries. 

Symptoms: In dysarthria, the speech mechanisms that control respiration, voice production, resonation and articulation are affected. Many individuals with dysarthric speech patterns also have difficulty swallowing. Dysarthric speech ranges from being slightly distorted to unintelligible. Persons with dysarthia are usually able to understand spoken and written language.

Treatment and Rehabilitation: Speech therapy programs, which teach individuals ways to improve overall speech intelligibility, can be effective. In more severe dysarthria augmentative communication devices, such as picture boards, computers and speech synthesizers, may be helpful.

·         Be a careful, patient listener. Allow extra time for communication.

Care Giver PA at

 http://caregiverpa.psu.edu/manual/text/s3-16-dysarthia.htm

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